State of Oregon Coronavirus News Update and Preparedness

Updated Monday, January 11, 2020

Oregon reports 1,643 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 28 new deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (4), Benton (37), Clackamas (125), Clatsop (5), Columbia (25), Coos (12), Crook (18), Curry (3), Deschutes (80), Douglas (20), Harney (6), Hood River (12), Jackson (121), Jefferson (8), Josephine (54), Klamath (35), Lake (1), Lane (101), Lincoln (13), Linn (49), Malheur (23), Marion (106), Morrow (14), Multnomah (369), Polk (38), Sherman (1), Tillamook (7), Umatilla (91), Union (15), Wallowa (2), Wasco (17), Washington (175), Yamhill (56).

Oregon’s 1576th COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Benton County who tested positive on December 14 and died on January 7 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1577th COVID-19 death is a 84-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on December 21 and died on January 8 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1578th COVID-19 death is a 82-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on December 21 and died on January 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1579th COVID-19 death is a 89-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on January 5 and died on January 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1580th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on December 31 and died on January 5 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1581st COVID-19 death is a 80-year-old man in Deschutes County who tested positive on December 28 and died on January 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1582nd COVID-19 death is a 89-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on December 11 and died on December 17 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1583rd COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Jackson County who died on December 26 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1584th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Jackson County who died on January 1 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1585th COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on December 28 and died on January 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1586th COVID-19 death is a 89-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on December 28 and died on January 2 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1587th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Klamath County who tested positive on December 22 and died on December 31 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1588th COVID-19 death is a 88-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on December 17 and died on December 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1589th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Klamath County who tested positive on December 12 and died on December 25 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1590th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on December 13 and died on January 8 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1591st COVID-19 death is a 85-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on November 27 and died on December 15 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1592nd COVID-19 death is a 80-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on December 30 and died on January 7 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1593rd COVID-19 death is a 84-year-old man in Morrow County who tested positive on January 4 and died on January 6 at Good Shepherd Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1594th COVID-19 death is a 79-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on November 28 and died on December 24 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1595th COVID-19 death is a 88-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on December 7 and died on January 5 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1596th COVID-19 death is a 86-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on December 17 and died on January 3; location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1597th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on December 17 and died on December 30 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1598th COVID-19 death is a 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on December 16 and died on January 5; location of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1599th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on December 28 and died on January 7 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1600th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on December 31 and died on January 1 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1601st COVID-19 death is a 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on December 27 and died on December 27. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1602nd COVID-19 death is a 85-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on December 27 and died on January 8 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1603rd COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on December 28 and died on January 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon adds 13,448 new COVID-19 vaccinations to statewide total

ious days (but entered into the state registry by providers on January 8th). As of yesterday, vaccination sites had administered 34 percent of Oregon’s current allocation of vaccine doses.

Oregon’s cumulative total is now 88,362 first and second doses administered. All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 421, which is 30 fewer than yesterday. There are 81 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

You can reduce your risk of getting or spread COVID-19 by keeping your social gatherings: small, brief, outdoors, physically distant.

Readers share tips about face coverings

We know that wearing a face covering correctly – that is, over your mouth and nose – is one of the most effective ways to slow the spread of COVID-19. People in Oregon are extremely creative and willing to go the extra mile to make wearing a face covering work for them. We asked Coronavirus Update readers to share their tips. Here’s some of what they told us: 

If your glasses are fogging up: 

  • Fold a tissue into a small rectangle and put in under the mask on the bridge of your nose.  
  • Raise the top of the face covering so that it’s under the bottom edge of your glasses.  
  • Use anti-fog spray or cloths. 
  • Rubbing soap on your glasses, then wiping it off with a microfiber cloth without rinsing. This can also work for a clear mask that may be worn to make it easier for those who are Deaf or hard of hearing to understand.  
  • Put a piece of paper medical tape or adhesive bandage across the top of the mask.  
  • Rub a pea-sized drop of shaving cream on your eyeglass lenses to prevent fogging. Do not use shaving cream with moisturizers. Polish until clear.  
  • Use a bit of vinegar and hot water on the lenses. 

To make it more comfortable: 

  • Repurpose swimsuits to make comfortable straps.  
  • Sew on the closure from a coffee bean bag, a pipe cleaner or twist tie from electronics packaging for a nose strip.  
  • Tie a string or ribbon to the elastic so the mask is secured around the head rather than behind the ears 
  • Slip your mask over the arm of your glasses (near your ear) to reduce pressure on your ears. 

To remember your face covering: 

  • Wear it on a lanyard.
  • Leave some extras in your glove compartment.
  • Keep an extra in your bag.
  • Keep it with your wallet and keys. 

One reader named Kathy reminded us why we wear face coverings, “Masks are about freedom! Freedom to stay safe and keep others safe, so you can do MORE.” 

Woman with baseball cap from the side wearing face mask with elastic around a button sewn onto baseball cap

Val sewed buttons by hand using needle and thread onto all of her baseball caps, a winter hat and a fleece ear warmer. If you place the buttons a little up and behind your ears, it solves three problems: 1) no painful ears 2) no slipping down the nose 3) less foggy glasses because the mask is more snug. Buttons need to be larger than shirt size, about 1/2″ diameter or a little larger seems to be best.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Ideas for celebrating holiday meals safely

Gathering around a table for a holiday meal will look different this year. During the freeze, only two households can gather together with no more than six people together total. Remember it’s safest to enjoy your holiday meal with only the people you live with.

If you choose to celebrate with the lowest risk for spreading COVID-19, here are some ideas: 

  • Join friends and family over a video call. Setting the computer at the end of your tables can make it look like you’re all at a long table together.   
  • Cook a pie or favorite dish and drop it off on your loved one’s home without contact.  
  • Exchange photos of the people (or food) at your meal with the people you would normally invite.  
  • Send an email or letter with stories or memories from past holidays to let people know you’re thinking of them. 

If you do decide to gather with another household at your home, the graphic below has suggestions for eating together safely.

Do not share food or utensils with them. Instead of dining family style or serving buffet-style

Stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday this year

For many people, Thanksgiving is a time for gathering with friends and family, watching football and eating delicious food. This year, with COVID-19 cases increasing rapidly both in Oregon and throughout the country, it’s important that people stay home and avoid travel for the holiday. Avoiding travel can reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 as well as the risk of bringing the virus back to Oregon.

Governor Brown issued a travel advisory on Nov. 13 that asks people who travel out of state for non-essential reasons, like tourism or recreation, or anyone who travels to Oregon from out of state for non-essential reasons, to quarantine for 14 days after returning home and to limit their interactions to people they live with.

COVID-19 vaccine one step closer to approval

November 18, 2020

Earlier this week, Pfizer and BioNTech filed a request for an emergency use authorization (EUA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its COVID-19 vaccine.

The good news comes with a reality check. Vaccination gives us hope that the pandemic will end, but in the meantime, we need to continue safety measures to keep the virus from spreading: Wear a mask, physically distance from others, wash your hands, avoid gatherings and stay home when you’re sick.

People who are most affected by the COVID-19 virus will have first access to the vaccination. In Oregon, that will be front-line health care workers who are exposed to the virus in their work.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) does not know how many doses of these vaccines will be immediately available in Oregon but expects a limited supply.

This news is very promising and demonstrates the potential for a safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine to be available in the coming months, provided it receives federal Emergency Use Authorization.

OHA is hopeful that we will see multiple safe and effective vaccines approved for fighting COVID-19 over the coming weeks and months, and we can begin reducing transmission of this virus, and reopening our state.

October 1, 2020

As we send this message, we know many of you are dealing with being evacuated from your homes or have friends and loved ones who have been evacuated. Many who have been evacuated don’t have homes to return to. The wildfires, on top of the COVID-19 public health crisis, increase the stress and anxiety we’re facing.

We’re thinking of you, and our hearts go out to everyone who is experiencing loss and struggling to get through this time. We will continue to share resources from OHA and other agencies to support your health and safety. If there’s anything you’d like us to share, please feel free to reach out to us. We always appreciate feedback from our readers. 

This is an incredibly challenging time for many reasons. It’s also important to know that if you need emotional support, help is available for you.

  • SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline provides 24/7, 365-day-a-year crisis counseling and support to people experiencing emotional distress related to natural or human-caused disasters. Call SAMHSA’s Disaster Distress Helpline at 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 to speak to a trained crisis counselor.
  • If you are experiencing a crisis, in an emergency, call 911. Help is also available from Lines for Life, a suicide prevention organization with specific resources for youth, military personnel and their families, and those affected by substance abuse problems. Visit linesforlife.org or call one of their helplines:
    • Suicide Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255, 1-888-628-9454 for Spanish
    • Alcohol and Drug Helpline: 1-800-923-4357
    • Military Helpline: 1-888-457-4838
    • Youthline: 1-877-968-8491 or text teen2teen to 839863
  • OHA also has contacts for crisis services by county on its website.

How to comfortably wear a face covering in the heat

As temperatures climb into the 90s in many parts of Oregon, it might feel out of place to wear a mask. But it’s still true that wearing a face covering will help slow the spread of COVID-19. The graphic below lists some ways to make wearing a mask more comfortable as temperatures rise.

Also remember to take the same precautions you would on other hot days:

  • Stay in air-conditioned places, if possible. Avoid relying on a fan as your main cooling device, particularly when the temperature is 90 or above.
  • Limit exposure to the sun from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., when temperatures are highest. Schedule activities in the morning and evening.
  • Use cool compresses, misting, and cool showers and baths.
  • Never leave infants or children in a parked car. (Pets shouldn’t be left in parked cars either — they can suffer heat-related illness, too.)
  • Even during the summer, the power can go out. Have a plan to stay cool if the power goes out.
  • Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink, especially while working outside.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.

Learn more about staying safe in hot weather.  

Helping children wear face coverings

Don’t forget that starting tomorrow, face coverings are required in outdoor public spaces when physical distancing is not possible. Masks, face shields and face coverings are currently required statewide for indoor public spaces (for example, grocery stores, pharmacies, public transit, personal services providers, restaurants, bars, retail stores, and more). People with a disability or medical condition may request accommodation from the business if they cannot wear a mask, face shield or face covering.

What are the rules for kids? At this time, children over the age of 2 and under the age of 12 are recommended, but not required, to wear a mask, face shield or face covering in these settings. Face coverings should be worn with adult supervision and should never be worn by kids when sleeping.

Here are some steps for helping a child wear a face covering, as well as some ways to talk to young children about masks.

To see more case and county-level data, go to the Oregon Health Authority COVID-19 website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus

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