Marine Board Approves $1.9 Million in Boating Facility Improvement Projects Statewide

The Oregon State Marine Board approved 15 grant requests for the Cycle One Boating Facility Grants program for the 2019-2021 biennium, during their quarterly Board meeting held on June 18, at the Marine Board office in Salem. Twenty-one applications were received from public boating facility managers from around the state, requesting nearly $8 million in recreational boating dollars, and $1.9 million available. 

Josephine County: Grant dollars were approved for a hydrologic analysis for Chinook Park on the Rogue River for future design, engineering, and permitting for a new boat ramp, parking, and maneuver area.  The Marine Board approved $30,000 in state boater funds, combined with $13,000 in applicant match for a total project cost of $43,000. 

Douglas County: Grant dollars were approved to obtain a consultant to complete an archeological survey and report for Amacher Park on the Umpqua River.  The park is a popular launch and retrieval point for thousands of recreational boaters, especially during salmon and steelhead season and for summer for paddling.  The Marine Board approved $42,710 in state boater funds, combined with $14,240 in applicant match for a total project cost of $56,950. In another grant request, the Board approved replacing the vault toilet at Ben Irving Park.  The current facility is nearly 40 years old.  The Marine Board approved $53,500 in state boater funds, combined with $21,100 of applicant match for a total project cost of $74,600.

Port of Alsea: Grant dollars were approved to replace the existing boat ramp, boarding docks and maneuver area at the Port of Alsea.  The Marine Board approved $162,500 in state boater funds, combined with $558,306 of applicant match for a total project cost of $720, 806. Permits are pending with the US Army Corps of Engineers and Department of State Lands.  The Port is planning to begin work once permits are in hand for the upcoming winter in-water construction window.

City of Gladstone: Grant dollars were approved to dredge the channel at Meldrum Bar. The boat ramp is located at the end of a 1,000-foot long channel.  Nearly four years ago boaters started contacting staff that the channel markers needed to be relocated because the channel was shallow in areas forcing boaters to disregard the markers.  The channel was surveyed and there has been a noticeable increase in sediment buildup since the channel was last dredged more than 25 years ago.  The Marine Board approved $71,825 in state boater funds, combined with $325,175 of applicant match for a total project cost of $400.000.  

City of North Bend: Grant dollars were approved to replace and extend the boarding docks, add piles and a debris deflection boom at the California Street boat ramp.  The boating facility is nearly 20 years old and portions of the infrastructure are showing signs of fatigue and need to be repaired or replaced. The wooden boarding docks have large areas of rot, damaged sub-frame, broken bull rails, and floatation saturation, in addition to corroded hinges, brackets, pile assemblies, and piling.  The City has also identified a need to expand the number of docks by adding a dog-leg.  The boat ramp can be blocked for a significant amount of time while boater parks or retrieves their vehicle during the peak season of use and the additional dock will improve efficiency.  The Marine Board approved $258,750 in state boater funds, combined with $464,787 of applicant match for a total project cost of $723,537.

Clackamas County: Grant dollars were approved to apply asphalt overlay and replace damaged curbing and sidewalks at Carver Park.  The county is planning to complete work in September.  The Marine Board approved $132,000 in state boater funds, combined with $62,325 of applicant match for a total project cost of $194,325.

City of West Linn: Grant dollars were approved to replace the boarding docks at Bernert Landing.  The current boarding docks, installed in 2004, were constructed with untreated Douglas fir, as required by the permits.  Wood rot was first noticed in 2017 and is accelerating to the point that the docks are falling apart.  The disintegrated wood is exposing floatation, holes and presents a serious safety hazard to boaters and the environment.  The new aluminum boarding docks have a 20-30 year useful life.  The Marine Board approved $113,250 in state boater funds, combined with $44,000 in applicant match for a total project cost of $157,250.

Metro: Grant dollars were approved to replace the use of the short term tie-up dock, gangway and piling, reinstall the pump out and dump station and dredge the basin at Chinook Landing.  This facility is approximately 25 years old and is the largest boating facility in the state. Design and engineering and permitting for the project are nearly complete.  The Marine Board approved $80,451.12 in state boater funds, combined with $429,792.98 in federal boater funds, combined with $893,907.40 in applicant match for a total project cost of $1,404,151.50. 

Lane County: Grant dollars were approved to replace the boat ramp at Hendricks Bridge and to expand the parking area.  The current ramp is an old asphalt ramp that is deteriorating.  There is a steep drop-off at the end of the ramp that can damage boat trailers and a strong current crossing the ramp, making it difficult to launch or retrieve.  There are only 11 boat trailer parking stalls and the existing demand exceeds the capacity.  The maneuver area and traffic flow pattern contribute to the conflict and congestion during peak use.  This is the final phase of improvements at this location over the last few biennia.  The Marine Board approved $197,500 in state boater funds, combined with $660,598 of applicant match for a total project cost of $858,098.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife: Grant dollars were approved to replace the boat ramp, pave the parking area and install a vault toilet on the Williamson River boat slide (AKA: Chiloquin Access).  The existing boat slide is unusable.  Instead, boaters are using the bank to launch and retrieve, leaving deep ruts, contributing to bank erosion.  An archaeological survey and report were completed and used to develop design and engineering for the installation of a concrete boat ramp, paved parking and new vault toilet.  The Marine Board approved $128,164 in state boater funds, combined with $399,286 in applicant match for a total project cost of $539,052.93.

Polk County: Grant dollars were approved to complete an archeological survey and report which will allow design and engineering of the boat ramp, boarding docks, and lower parking area to be finalized at the Buena Vista County Park.  The Marine Board approved $60,000 in state boater funds, combined with $10,000 in applicant match for a total project cost of $70,000.

Jackson County: Grant dollars were approved for Howard Prairie Resort Marina relocation.  Since the County took over the operation of the resort they have been working with OSMB engineering staff and a consultant to develop a new, ADA compliant, long-lasting and environmentally friendly facility for recreational boaters.  The county is proposing to relocate the entire marina to accommodate boaters during leaner water years, resulting in more use days.  The grant will replace the short term tie-up and docks, piling and breakwater, in addition to replacing the marine fuel station and install a pump out on the fuel dock.  The Marine Board approved $442,033.25 in state boater funds, combined with 135,375.75 in federal boater funds, with $5,176,726 in applicant match for a total project cost of $5,758,134.

US Forest Service –Hells Canyon: Grant dollars were approved to replace the boat ramp, boarding docks, retaining wall and gangway to allow users of all experience levels to enjoy the Snake River.  The Marine Board approved $206,350 in state boater funds, combined with $206,350 in applicant match for a total project cost of $412,700.

Most boating facility projects take time and multiple phases to complete based on the need for studies, permit applications, and design and engineering services.  It is not uncommon for improvements to happen slowly due to funding and permitting challenges, combined with the timing for in-water work periods, the cost of materials and services with fluctuating market values.  The Marine Board works very closely with grant applicants in every step of the process, from submitting the initial application to ribbon-cutting when a facility project is complete.  The Marine Board relies on willing partners who provide access to the recreational boating public by offering grant funding for boating facility project improvements, with registration and titling fees paid by motorized boaters.  In the future, non-motorized access grants will be awarded for improvements that support the needs of the paddling community, through revenue collected from the Waterway Access Permit, going into effect in 2020.

Must Read

Simple Tips To Stay Safe During Extreme Heat Conditions

Brian Casey

Rogue Valley Sports Update – Blazers, Ducks, Beavers, and Bowl Game Schedule!

Brian Casey

Bureau of Land Management Offers New Incentives To Encourage More Adoptions of Wild Horses And Burros

Brian Casey