Rogue Valley News, Wednesday 6/5 – Three Jackson County Creeks Exceed Bacteria Levels, Structure Fire at Boise Cascade Plywood & Other Local and Statewide News…

The latest news stories of interest in the Rogue Valley and the state of Oregon from the digital home of Southern Oregon, Wynne Broadcasting’s RogueValleyMagazine.com

Wednesday,  June 5, 2024

Rogue Valley Weather

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Three Jackson County Creeks Exceed Bacteria Levels

Three creeks in Jackson County have exceeded the state standards for bacteria levels when it comes to recreational contact.

According to the Rogue Valley Council of Governments (RVCOG), Natural Resources Department, the routine monthly water quality testing indicates sections of Bear Creek, Griffin Creek, and Jackson Creek have elevated levels of bacteria.

Possible causes of the increased bacteria include pet, livestock or wild animal waste, leaking septic systems, illegal dumping from RVs or  portable toilets as well as “any other activity that results in the discharge of fecal matter into creeks or through storm drains.”

Specifically sections of Bear Creek between South Valley View Road in Ashland to Fern Valley Road in Phoenix have been impacted. Additionally Griffin Creek at Beall Lane in Central Point and Jackson Creek between West Ross Lane in Jacksonville to Dean Creek Road in Ashland have higher levels.

MORE INFO: RVCOG Natural Resources Department website.

 

Construction work today – Hwy 99 @ S Stage Rd – expect delays and use alternate routes

Asphalt repair work at/near the intersection of Highway 99 and South Stage Road in South Medford will create delays today 6/4/24.  Avoid the area and use alternate routes if at all possible.  Use caution and watch for workers and equipment.

 

Structure Fire at Boise Cascade Plywood

Crews from Fire District 3 and Medford Fire Department are on scene of a reported structure fire at Boise Cascade Plywood at 3285 N. Pacific Hwy. Medford. The fire was upgraded to a Second Alarm, which has now been reduced to a First Alarm response.May be an image of ambulance and text

Sprinklers in the facility activated to suppress the fire and all occupants have been evacuated. There was minor extension of the fire out of the vent cap onto the roof. Truck 20 provided aerial suppression) and was spotted by our tethered drone. The sprinkler system of the facility did a great job of the initial suppression of the fire which limited the spread, along with Boise Cascade personnel and our crews.

Suspect In Medford Stabbing Murder Trial Set Later This Month

May be an image of 1 person and text that says 'HANNAH MARTIN'The woman accused of stabbing another woman to death in Medford is headed to trial later this month.  Hannah  Marie Martin is charged with robbery in the first degree and two counts of murder in the second degree. The case is scheduled to go to trial on June 25.

Medford Police said 31-year-old Brittany Lovrovich was stabbed in the parking lot area of Rumors Lounge on Riverside Avenue on March 22, 2022.  The suspects, Martin and Zackary Carl Helwagen are charged with two counts of second degree murder.

The defense said they are working on selecting jury members and they have four witnesses they plan to call during the trial.  Helwagen is scheduled to go to trial on September 9.

 

May be an image of 9 people and text that says 'Frog 0' Faire Community Children's Festival Riverside Park June 8, 2024 FREEI FREE! 9 AM -2PM - 2 PM ลุนไพ้ iz 304 E. Park St, Grants Pass GET READY FOR LOTS OF FUN! family activities obstacle course face painting performances by food Trucks local kid's classes Princess lessons and more! games crafts vendors art allcarehealth® EVERCREEN FEDERAL BANK SUMMIT CONSTRUCTION PAINTING SOS Southern Oregon Sanitation Inc. LEGACY FAMILY & LEADERSHIP'

 

Sheriff Deputies Arrest Suspect in Rural Shady Cove Homicide 

SHADY COVE, Ore. – Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) deputies responded to a potential homicide call today, June 1st at 11:03 a.m. in rural Shady Cove. ECSO Dispatch received the 911 call for a possible homicide with an armed suspect on scene at a property in the 23000 block of Highway 62 north of Shady Cove. JCSO Deputies arrived with the SWAT Bearcat to locate the armed suspect.

ECSO Dispatch received another 911 call for the potential suspect at the Trail market in Trail, Ore. JCSO deputies responded to the market and took the suspect into custody without incident. The victim’s name will be released pending next-of-kin notification.

JCSO Medical Examiners arrived to the scene of the crime to begin the death investigation. Cause of death is pending the autopsy by an Oregon State Police forensic pathologist. Detectives from JCSO and Central Point Police Department responded to the scene to assume the homicide investigation.

The suspect, Travis Clayton Driver, 34, of Shady Cove, is in custody charged with second-degree murder. He is lodged in the Jackson County Jail.

This case is open and ongoing with detectives continuing their investigation. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office will prosecute the case. There is no further information available for release at this time.

Man Arrested After Taking Children Hostage in Ashland Apartment Leading to Multi-Hour Standoff 

 

ASHLAND, Ore. – Two children are safe, and a Central Point man is in jail today after Ashland Police Department (APD) responded to a call for a suicidal, potentially armed man taking children hostage in an Ashland apartment last night. The call came into ECSO Dispatch at 5:53 p.m. on Thursday, May 30 with information the man was holding two children, ages 4 and 7, hostage in an apartment in the 300 block of Engle Street in Ashland. After a nearly 7-hour standoff with police, the man is in the Jackson County Jail, and the children are safe.

APD lodged the suspect, Erik Macias, 36, of Central Point, on charges of felony fourth-degree domestic violence assault, domestic violence menacing, coercion, and driving while suspended. Macias also had two outstanding felony warrants including fourth-degree domestic violence assault, and driving under the influence of intoxications (DUII).

Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) SWAT and Crisis Negotiators Team (CNT) responded to assist APD just before 9 p.m. The SWAT team and APD surrounded the apartment while detectives applied for a search warrant. CNT made phone contact with the suspect and attempted to negotiate for approximately three hours. When negotiations failed, the SWAT team used a diversionary device (flash bang) outside the apartment along with JCSO K9 announcements, and made entry into the apartment. SWAT arrested the suspect without incidence, and rescued the children at 12:42 a.m. The children are safe and were returned to their mother.

This case is open and ongoing, with APD following additional leads. There is no further information available for release at this time.

Popsicle Patrol – Saturday June 8th

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The Medford Police Department will be helping residents stay cool this summer by handing out free popsicles and water to kids and adults during their Popsicle Patrols.
901 Rossanley Dr, Medford, OR 97501     2pm to 4pm
The popsicles and waters will be handed out while supplies last.  https://www.facebook.com/events/2762383037252144/?ref=newsfeed

 

 

Crater Lake National Park is seeking public input on a draft accessibility self-evaluation and transition plan. Public comment on the plan is being sought through June 14

The National Park Service (NPS) is dedicated to serving all visitors to help them find meaning in the resources of the national park system and its stories. Recently, park staff embarked on a process to ensure that key park experiences are available to all visitors, regardless of race, nationality, socioeconomic status, or ability. Park staff conducted a self-evaluation of the accessibility of park facilities, services, activities, and programs. Based on these findings, staff then drafted a transition plan that identifies opportunities and critical steps for improving accessibility parkwide.

This draft accessibility self-evaluation and transition plan resulted from the work of an interdisciplinary team of NPS staff, including planning, design, and construction professionals; and interpretive, resource, visitor safety, maintenance, and accessibility specialists. The draft plan identifies key visitor experiences at the park and existing barriers to accessing these experiences for people with disabilities.

The plan provides recommendations for removing barriers at priority park areas, including specific actions, example site plans, and anticipated time frames for implementation. It also addresses park policies, practices, communication, and training needs.

The goals of the plan are as follows:

1) Document existing park barriers to accessibility for people with disabilities.
2) Provide an effective approach for upgrading facilities, services, and programs.
3) Instill a culture around creating universal access.

All recommended actions will be subject to funding, consultation with other agencies, consultation with Tribes, and compliance with federal laws, such as the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Historic Preservation Act. Moving forward, the National Park Service will use this plan as a guide to obtain funding and plan and implement projects that will improve accessibility throughout the park.

Your input on the draft plan will help us as we work to ensure that Crater Lake National Park is more accessible to all visitors. To review the draft plan and send online comments, click on “Document List” or “Open for Comment” on the left side of the web page. The plan will be open for comment for 37 days, from May 8, 2024, to June 14, 2024. —- https://parkplanning.nps.gov/projectHome.cfm?projectID=123216

 

Possible Missing Person — Rogue River Trail 

Press Release

Press Release

DETAILS: On Friday May 17, 2024 at approximately 4:44 pm, Josephine County Sheriff’s Office received a citizen report of a backpack and dog leash that was found on the Rogue River Trail and there appeared to be no sign of a person or dog in the area.  The reporting party stated that they noticed the backpack on their way down the trail. Upon seeing the backpack and belongings still in place later that afternoon on their way out, the citizen made a report to the Sheriff’s Office.

On Saturday May 18, 2024, a Josephine County Sheriff’s Office deputy hiked the trail and located the backpack on the trail approximately 1 mile south of the Grave Creek Boat Ramp. A search with verbal callouts did not locate a person or dog.  Additionally, a drone was utilized to try to locate the owner. Further investigation revealed the backpack has possibly been in that location since Wednesday May 15, 2024. The contents of the backpack suggested the owner was preparing to start a multi-day camping trip and items in the pack did not appear to have been used. There was also no identifying information located in the pack. The Sheriff’s Office is concerned the owner of the backpack may have become injured or lost. No missing persons reports have been filed that match the situation nor is there any evidence of foul play.

The Sheriff’s Office is actively trying to locate the owner of the backpack.   If you have any information regarding the backpack or who the owner may be, please contact the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office 541-474-5123.

State Holding Open House Meetings on Community Wildfire Programs in Central Point and Grants Pass

— A series of six open houses about the state’s new community wildfire risk reduction programs are scheduled June 3 through July 1 across Oregon. These events will offer opportunities to learn about new defensible space and home hardening standards, as well as the draft wildfire hazard map.

Oregon Department of Forestry

The resource-fair style open houses are being held in the communities that have some of the greatest levels of wildfire hazard within the wildland-urban interface. Each open house will begin with a short presentation and introductions, but visitors may stop in at any point during the event to get questions answered about the draft hazard map and associated community wildfire programs.

Representatives from multiple agencies will be present to have one-on-one or small group conversations to help people understand Oregon’s statewide wildfire programs.

  • Oregon Department of Forestry representatives will address questions on administrative rules and hazard zone assessment appeals.
  • Oregon State University representatives will address questions on wildfire hazard science, statewide data sources, and updates to the draft hazard map made over the last two years.
  • Oregon State Fire Marshal representatives will address questions regarding defensible space standards, code adoption process and implementation.
  • Building Codes Division representatives from the Department of Consumer and Business Services will address questions on home hardening construction standards, related code provisions, and implementation.
  • Division of Financial Regulation representatives from the Department of Consumer and Business Services will address questions on home insurance market and requirements of insurers under Senate Bill 82 (2023).
  • Wildfire Programs Advisory Council members will address questions on statewide policy direction for wildfire programs and council business.

Meetings will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. on the following dates:

  • Central Point—Monday, June 17, Jackson County Fairgrounds, Mace Building, 1 Peninger Rd., Central Point, OR 97502
  • Grants Pass—Thursday, June 20, Grants Pass High School, 830 NE 9th St., Grants Pass, OR 97526
  • Klamath Falls—Monday, June 24, Klamath County Event Center, Hall #2, 3531 S 6th St., Klamath Falls, OR 97603
  • The Dalles—Monday, July 1, Oregon Military Department Armory, 402 E. Scenic Dr., The Dalles, OR 97058

Find more information on ODF’s wildfire hazard webpage.

To subscribe to information related to updates on the statewide wildfire hazard map, visit the ODF website.

Background: The 2021 Legislature passed Senate Bill 762 that required the Oregon Department of Forestry to develop and maintain a comprehensive statewide map of wildfire risk that included wildland-urban interface boundaries and five fire risk classes by June 30, 2022, in collaboration with Oregon State University. After the initial version of the map was rescinded August 4, 2022, ODF and OSU began gathering feedback and incorporating it into future mapping efforts.

The 2023 Legislature passed Senate Bill 80 that made several changes to the map including changing the name from a “risk” map to a “hazard” map, reducing the number of hazard classes from five to three, and changing the appeal and notification requirements.

Written comment or questions about any aspect of the implementation of Senate Bill 762 and Senate Bill 80 may be submitted by email at any time to ehazardmap@odf.oregon.gov“>odf.wildfirehazardmap@odf.oregon.gov.

 

Child Exploitation Task Force Arrests Eagle Point Man for Victimizing Children Online Nationwide, Investigators Looking for Additional Victims

JCSO Case 22-4129 EAGLE POINT, Ore. – The Southern Oregon Child Exploitation Team (SOCET) joint inter-agency task force arrested a Medford man on multiple child sex crime charges at 2:28 p.m. today in Eagle Point. Jackson County Sheriff’s Office (JCSO) and Eagle Point Police Department assisted with the arrest at a business near the intersection of Hwy 62 and West Linn Road.

During their investigation, SOCET discovered the suspect was communicating nationwide with at least five underage victims through several social media sites. SOCET investigators identified a 13-year-old victim from Kansas City, Missouri, and are attempting to identify the additional underage victims.

The suspect, Zachary Elijah Bowen, 22, of Medford, Ore., was arrested on 12 felony charges including using a child in display of sexually explicit conduct, 10 counts of second-degree encouraging child sexual abuse, and luring a minor. He was booked and lodged in the Jackson County Jail.

SOCET started investigating Bowen after more than a dozen National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) cyber tips led to multiple residences where he lived in Portland and at a licensed marijuana farm in Trail, Ore. SOCET served a search warrant on February 7, 2023, at the marijuana farm in the 4700 block of Highway 227 in Trail. Investigators seized digital devices for forensic examination by Southern Oregon High Tech Crimes Task Force (SOHTCTF).

Investigators found evidence of Bowen communicating nationwide with at least five underage victims through social media sites such as SnapChat, Instagram, Kik, and Google under the username “zach_grant2152.” If you have any information on Bowen, contact investigators through the Sheriff’s App “Submit a Tip” feature. Download the App here: https://apps.myocv.com/share/a72997501. You can also call the JCSO Tip Line at (541) 774-8333 and reference case number 22-4129.

SOCET is a joint inter-agency task force that started in June of 2020 to combat child exploitation and human trafficking. The task force consists of investigators from JCSO and Homeland Security Investigations with some collaboration from Oregon State Police and Medford Police Department; as well as prosecutors from our local, state and federal law enforcement partners in Jackson and Josephine County.

This case is under further investigation with detectives following additional leads and attempting to identify other victims. Jackson County District Attorney’s Office will prosecute the case. There is no further information available for release.

 

These are pretty good odds: About 1 in every 4 students who apply for an RCC Foundation scholarship will receive one. Most awards are $1,000-$6,000 per year. 💵💰
But you can’t receive a scholarship if you don’t apply! The deadline to apply for 2024-25 scholarships is June 1.  —-   Visit roguecc.edu/scholarships to get started.

David Grubbs’ Murder Investigation Remains Active

Community still looking for answers in violent 2011 murder of David Grubbs on Ashland, Oregon bike path The Ashland Police Department’s investigation into the murder of David Grubbs on November 19, 2011 remains open and active. Recently two new detectives have been assigned to look into new leads that have come in.

This case remains important to David’s family, the community, and the Ashland Police Department. As detectives continue to pursue these new leads, anyone with additional information is encouraged to reach out to the Ashland Police Department at 541-488-2211. The reward for information leading to an arrest on this case remains at over $21,000.

Fauna Frey, 45, disappeared in Oregon on a road trip, June 29, 2020, following her brother’s death  —

https://original.newsbreak.com/@ada-e-1668135/3304227455096-fauna-frey-45-disappeared-in-oregon-on-a-road-trip-june-29-2020-following-her-brother-s-death

PART 2 – Newsweek Podcast Focusing on The Disappearance of Fauna Frey From Lane County

Here One Minute, Gone the Next —– PART 2 – Josephine County Sheriff Dave Daniel joins investigative journalist Alex Rogue to speak with Here One Minute, Gone the Next about the disappearance of Fauna Frey, the growing friction between citizen investigators and law enforcement, and the lack of resources in missing persons cases. https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-disappearance-of-fauna-frey-pt2-feat-sheriff/id1707094441?i=1000630100040 PART 1 – John Frey joins Newsweek to discuss exclusive details about the case of his missing daughter that until now have been unavailable to the general public. READ MORE HERE: https://www.newsweek.com/exclusive-what-happened-fauna-frey-new-clues-uncovered-1827197?fbclid=IwAR3Z3Glru5lIgqiYXbs_nA1Fj8JuCIzM11OHSVHfwIucfq2f_G5y9y5bnmQ If you have any information on the whereabouts of Fauna Frey, call the anonymous tip line at 541-539-5638 or email FindFaunaFrey@gmail.com.

Help Find Fauna Frey #FindFaunaFrey FACEBOOK GROUP

 

PacifiCorp To Pay $178M To Oregon Wildfire Victims In Latest Settlement Over Deadly 2020 Wildfires

Pacific Power, part of PacifiCorp, said Monday it has agreed to a $178M settlement with over 400 Oregon plaintiffs in the latest multimillion-dollar payout related to the deadly 2020 wildfires that ravaged the state.

In other cases that have gone to trial over the past year, Oregon juries in multiple verdicts have ordered PacifiCorp to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to victims. Ongoing litigation could leave it on the hook for billions.

The majority of the 403 plaintiffs in the settlement Monday were affected by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire that devastated Oregon’s central coast, said George McCoy, one of the plaintiffs’ attorneys, while others were impacted by the Santiam Fire that raged east of the state capital Salem in northwestern Oregon.

In a statement, the utility said it has settled nearly 1,500 claims stemming from the Labor Day 2020 wildfires. The blazes were among the worst natural disasters in Oregon’s history, killing nine people, burning more than 1,875 square miles (4,856 square kilometers) and destroying thousands of homes and other structures.

acifiCorp faces more lawsuits over the blazes, including one filed last month by dozens of Oregon wineries and vineyards seeking over $100 million in damages. In their suit, the wine producers alleged that the utility’s decision to not turn off power during the Labor Day windstorm contributed to blazes whose smoke and soot damaged their grapes and reduced their harvest and sales.

Last June, a jury found PacifiCorp liable for negligently failing to cut power to its 600,000 customers despite warnings from top fire officials. The jury determined it acted negligently and willfully and should have to pay punitive and other damages — a decision that applied to a class including the owners of up to 2,500 properties.

Thousands of other class members are still awaiting trials, although the sides are also expected to engage in mediation that could lead to a settlement.

Last week, Oregon utility regulators rejected a request from PacifiCorp that sought to limit its liability in wildfire lawsuits.

Under the proposal, the utility would only have been responsible for paying out actual economic damages in lawsuit awards. The Oregon Public Utility Commission said the request was too broad, and that such a move would prohibit payouts for noneconomic damages such as pain, mental suffering and emotional distress.

State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council Will Meet on June 11th

Salem, Ore. – The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council will meet at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, June 11, 2024. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the council’s website.

  • What: Meeting of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council
  • When: Tuesday, June 11, 2024, 2:00 – 4:00 p.m.
  • Where: Microsoft Teams | Join Meeting
  • Meeting ID: 216 565 392 995 Passcode: ekgWVp
  • Phone: +1 503-446-4951 Phone conference ID: 944 308 59#
  • Who: State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council

The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council was established by Governor Kotek’s Executive Order 23-26, Establishing a State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council.

The purpose of the Council is to recommend an action plan to guide awareness education, and usage of artificial intelligence in state government that aligns with the State’s policies, goals, and values and supports public servants to deliver customer service more efficiently and effectively. The recommended action plan shall include concrete executive actions, policies, and investments needed to leverage artificial intelligence while honoring transparency, privacy, and diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Meetings of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council are open to the public.

Public comment may be made during the meeting. Sign-up for public comment is required as spots are limited. Sign-up closes Monday, June 9 at noon. Written comment will also be accepted. Written comment can be submitted by mail to the Council Support Office, 550 Airport Rd SE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301 or online via the office form.

Accommodations can be arranged for persons with disabilities, and alternate formats of printed material are available upon request. Please contact Enterprise Information Services at 503-378-3175 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to request accommodations. Closed captioning is included on the Microsoft Teams meeting.

Links:

Oregonians Targeted By Text Tolling Scam

A new nationwide texting scam is targeting Oregon drivers now. Ellen Klem, with the Oregon Attorney General’s Office says the phishing scheme started in the midwest earlier in the spring. “I’m honestly not surprised it’s happening now, because now is the time where everyone is gearing up to drive.”

The text claims to be from “Oregon Toll Service” and says the recipient owes an $11.69 outstanding balance; they face a $50 late fee if they don’t click on a link and pay up. Klem says some people may identify the fraud right away, because Oregon doesn’t have tolling, “But, we live next to all these other states that have tolls.” And she worries some will fall for it.

“They are not interested in the $11,” says Klem, “They are interested in much, much more.” She believes the scammers want your personal information, and clicking on the link could allow them to access other data on your phone.

The text has all the markers of a scam, like contact out of the blue from an unknown agency. “There’s a lot of really cheap or free technology out there that allows the scammers to pretend to be somebody they’re not. So, in this case, they’re pretending to be associated with an agency that administers tolls in the state of Oregon. But that doesn’t exist,” says Klem, “Second sign: There’s some sort of emergency. In this case, you have an unpaid bill; that’s frightening to a lot of people.”

She suggests not being in such a rush to respond to every text or email, “These phones, they’re everywhere and we have this sort of automatic response to click on a link or to pick up every phone call. And, I want to remind people just to slow down and think before you click on anything.” Klem adds, “Really, at the end of the day, this is a text message that you can and you should ignore.”

If you get a text, email or phone call you’re not sure is legit, call the Oregon Department of Justice Consumer hotline at 877-877-9392. Volunteer experts are available weekdays between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m.

New Report Finds Road Rage Shootings Have Increased In Oregon Over The Past Decade But Are Still Well Below The National Average

Nationally, road rage shooting incidents skyrocketed over the past decade, from 83 in 2014 to 456 in 2023 — a nearly 450% jump, according to an analysis of Gun Violence Archive data by The Trace.

  • Road rage shootings in Oregon went from zero in 2014 to 0.7 people per 1 million in 2023: the national average is 1.4.

The country’s road rage hot spots were New Mexico, with 2.65 shooting incidents per 1 million people, followed by Wisconsin (1.94) and Tennessee (1.91).

Oregon has experienced some high-profile road rage shootings in recent years.

In March, Geoffrey Edward Hammond pleaded not guilty to charges of fatally shooting Ryan Martin, 47, after arguing about parking in front of the Moxy Hotel.

  • Prosecutors accuse Hammond of also wounding a passing architect, Samuel Gomez, whose photo of being pointed at with a gun later won an award. Hammond pleaded not guilty to that too.

In May, a 25-year-old man pleaded guilty except for insanity to second-degree murder for killing a Tigard man two years ago after a dispute on Highway 18.

  • The slain driver’s partner said their wiper fluid may have splashed a BMW driving behind them, starting a chain of events that led to the shooting.

Caveat: The Gun Violence Archive is a private nonprofit that produces a range of estimates based on police reports, government data, news stories and more. Some incidents go unreported, so the data is likely an undercount. (SOURCE)

An Oregon man and his four dogs were rescued earlier this week after his vehicle plunged off an embankment and into a creek in Baker County – with one of the dogs traveling nearly four miles to alert humans for help.

Baker County Sheriff’s Office —  · Press Release: Halfway Man Rescued After Car Crash Leaves Him Stranded Overnight

On June 3, 2024 at approximately 9:28 a.m., Baker County Sheriff’s Office Dispatch received a report of a vehicle over an embankment on U.S. Forest Service Road 39. The reporting party explained that his brother, Brandon Garrett, had not made it to his camp yesterday afternoon. Family members located his vehicle this morning but were unable to reach it due to the terrain.

May be an image of offroad vehicle

 

May be an image of 9 people
May be an image of 4 people and tree
https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=pfbid037CEP1dt1vLj4MWcdPHV22WG4hy3swLauqLty7A2Nvu1DL68TbDLXUzeEJTJtswjAl&id=100064434892363&ref=embed_post

Baker County Sheriff’s Office, Baker County Search and Rescue, Pine Valley Rural Fire District and Halfway Ambulance responded to the scene. Sheriff Ash arrived and located the vehicle, along with a dog, in the steep, brushy ravine. As he was looking for an access point to the creek, he heard a subject yell for help. Brandon Garrett, operator of the vehicle, was located alive approximately one hundred yards from the vehicle above the creek. Sheriff Ash rendered first aid. Pine Valley Rural Fire volunteers and U.S. Forest Service employees used chainsaws to clear a path for Search and Rescue.

Members of the Baker County Search and Rescue Ropes Team set up their rescue equipment and began the difficult task of reaching Garrett. Once the team was able to reach him, they loaded and secured him in a rescue basket. He was connected to a highline rope system and pulled across the ravine, where he was transferred to a group of SAR members and medical personnel.

Garrett was transported by Halfway Ambulance to the Life Flight helicopter, where he was airlifted to a regional hospital. During the investigation, it was determined that Garrett was traveling north on U.S. Forest Service Road 39 on June 2nd with his four dogs, when he failed to negotiate a curve causing the vehicle to plummet off the embankment. One of his dogs traveled the nearly four miles to their camp, which alerted the rest of the party that something was wrong. Garrett was able to crawl approximately one hundred yards from the vehicle, where he spent the night. The rest of the party continued to search for him, and family members located his vehicle on the morning of June 3rd. The three remaining dogs were located alive at the crash scene.

Baker County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank Baker County Search and Rescue, Pine Valley Rural Fire District, Halfway Ambulance, Life Flight and the U.S. Forest Service for their assistance during this rescue.

OHA kicks off 2024 Oregon beach monitoring season

Agency shares list of monitored beaches for May-September

—The Oregon Beach Monitoring Program (OBMP) is kicking off the 2024 beach monitoring season by announcing the list of coastal recreation areas it will be keeping an eye on for bacteria during summer and early fall.

The 24 beaches on the list that the OBMP, based at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Public Health Division, is publishing includes some of the most frequently visited beaches in Oregon. It also includes beaches where the program has found bacteria present, or beaches for which local partners and the public have requested monitoring due to potential pollution concerns.

The following are Oregon beaches being monitored during 2024, including beach name, and the city and county in which they are located:

Beach monitoring season runs from mid-May to mid-September. Beach advisories are only issued for beaches that are actively being monitored within this sampling window. Other beaches will be investigated for inclusion in the next beach monitoring season.

OBMP works with Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to identify beaches that need monitoring based on several established criteria. These criteria include: pollution hazards present; previous beach monitoring data that identify water quality concerns; type and amount of beach use; and public input.

As part of an adaptive sampling plan, beaches and sampling locations are routinely re-evaluated to ensure available resources best protect public health. A copy of DEQ’s beach evaluation is available upon request.

For more information and current beach monitoring conditions please visit: www.healthoregon.org/beach, or contact OBMP at each.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov“>Beach.Health@odhsoha.oregon.gov or 971-673-0400.

The investigation continues into what’s causing balls of tar to wash up on Oregon and Washington beaches.

The U.S. Coast Guard, Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Washington Department of Ecology are working under a Joint Operations Center. They know the tar balls are petroleum based, but they don’t know the source. There have been no reports of spills from ships. Several birds are being treated for exposure to the oil. Three Common Murres were cleaned and released on the northern Washington Coast.

These sightings come after multiple birds covered in black oil were found washed up on the coast between Long Beach, Wash. and Lincoln City. They add the U.S. Coast Guard and other agencies are working to determine the source of the tar-like product, but it is unknown at this time.

Authorities are encouraging beachgoers not to handle any oil-covered wildlife or touch any tar patties found. However, they say to report any findings to 1-800-22-BIRDS (1-800-222-4737).

Oregon has the highest rate of animal vehicle collisions on the West Coast.

The Oregon Zoo and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have developed a project to identify the deadliest roads. The iNaturalist Roadkills of Oregon project asks you to take photos of animals killed by cars.

The picture will be uploaded into an app, so biologists will be able to track areas where the most collisions occur. Currently, only large animals like deer and elk are tracked. This project will monitor all animals that are killed.

Roadways and vehicular traffic are a significant contributor to fragmentation of habitat and impacts to wildlife, including injury and mortality. The purpose of this project is to improve our understanding of the impacts of roads on Oregon’s wildlife, and to identify roadkill hot spots and vulnerabilities among a diversity of animals, including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and invertebrates. This information can help reduce wildlife-vehicle collisions and make roadways safer. Please go to: https://www.inaturalist.org/projects/roadkills-of-oregon/journal

SUMMER ALERT: Blood and platelet donors needed now — American Red Cross – Cascades Region

Red Cross provides support to communities devastated by recent storms

— The American Red Cross critically needs blood and platelet donors now following a concerning decrease in donations as the country has experienced an increase in severe weather systems and historic travel.In fact, over the past month about 20,000 fewer blood donations were collected than needed to maintain the Red Cross-national blood supply.

According to the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), five of the busiest travel days ever happened this month and more record-breaking travel is expected this summer — a busy time when many regular donors may be unable to give. Additionally, as the U.S. approaches what AAA calls the “100 deadliest days” of summer for auto accidents, it is critical hospitals have lifesaving blood products on hand for all trauma and accident victims who count on transfusions when there is no time to waste. In some of the most-dire situations, medical teams may need to use hundreds of blood products to save a life.

“Emergencies take many forms – some arising in a hospital and others arising as relentless and devastating storms,” said Priscilla Fuentes, regional executive of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “Unfortunately, our community has been no stranger to emergencies these past few years, but when I witness communities come together – at a blood drive or after a disaster – I see us growing stronger and becoming more resilient. Together, we can provide help and hope that is very much needed right now.”

Storm response efforts: The holiday weekend brought the busiest severe weather day of the year so far, with 26 reported tornadoes across 10 states.

With the most active year for tornadoes since 2017, hundreds of Red Cross disaster workers, including more than 20 from our region, are working around the clock with partners across multiple states to make sure people affected by this severe weather have a safe place to stay, food, relief supplies and emotional and spiritual support. Emergency shelters are open in some of the hardest hit areas. Red Cross disaster workers are helping assess the damage where it is safe to do so with preliminary reports indicating nearly 3,000 homes either destroyed or with major damage across the country.

The Red Cross is monitoring the weather and standing by to open additional shelters if needed. Should new communities be impacted, the organization will be on the ground providing help in the days and weeks to come.

How to help: Individuals are urged to help those facing emergencies – whether they need a lifesaving blood transfusion or shelter from the storm.

  • Make a blood donation appointment by downloading the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visiting RedCrossBlood.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years old and younger must meet certain height and weight requirements.
  • Featured blood drive: Saturday, June 8, Portland Chapter Building 3131 N. Vancouver Ave. Go to RedCrossBlood.org for times or other dates and locations.
  • Help people affected by disasters like flooding and countless other crises by making a financial donation to Red Cross Disaster Relief today at redcross.org or via 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Your gift enables the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.
  • Put on a red vest and join us as a volunteer today to provide relief and hope when it matters most. Visit redcross.org/volunteertoday to sign up for local opportunities, like our Disaster Action Team, or Bood Donor Ambassador Program.

The Red Cross has teamed up with Tetris, creators of the iconic, best-selling video game, to celebrate their 40th anniversary and build the blood supply for patients in need. In commemoration, all who answer the call to help May 20-June 9, 2024, will get an exclusive Tetris® + Red Cross T-shirt, while supplies last, plus be automatically entered for a chance to win a trip for two to New York to meet Tetris creator, Alexey Pajitnov. See RedCrossBlood.org/Tetris for details.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross provides shelter, food and comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation’s blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or follow us on social media.

Come to the World Beat Festival to Experience Global Cultures: Ukraine is the 2024 Featured Country

Salem Multicultural Institute is excited to celebrate Ukraine as the 27th annual World Beat Festival’s featured country. World Beat is one of Salem’s premier community traditions, offering a vibrant two-day program of international music, dance, song, theater, food, crafts, customs, rituals, and folklore. This year’s festival will begin Friday evening, June 28, and run through Sunday, June 30, at Salem’s Riverfront Park.

Kathleen Fish, Executive Director, emphasizes that this is the only festival of its kind honoring the Salem/Keizer community’s rich tapestry of cultures. “There are 107 languages spoken in our school district. The festival recognizes and explores the cultures of many of these families.”

The festivities kick off Friday, June 28, from 5 to 10 p.m. with “Friday Night at the Beat,” featuring vocal performances and fire dancing on the Main Stage.

The festival opens at 10 a.m. on Saturday, June 29, with the Children’s Parade. Kids who want to participate in the parade will assemble at the Pavilion at the North End of the park.

Each child who attends will receive a passport at the entrance gate to collect stamps from each World Village. Village tents will feature kid-friendly cultural games and activities. This year’s activities include making cherry blossoms in the Asian Pacific Village, Pysanky (traditional egg decorating) in the European Village, Arpilleras (traditional Chilean textile art) in the Americas Village, and crafting Nguni Shields in the Africa & Middle East Village.

Adults can enjoy beverages in the beer garden while listening to live music. Boating enthusiasts can cheer on their favorite teams during the World Beat Dragon Boat Races.

“We had over 25,000 guests attend last year, enjoying performances on seven stages representing more than 50 different countries and cultures. Our visitors come from all over the Northwest and even Canada,” added Fish.

Organized by the volunteer-driven Salem Multicultural Institute, the festival requires 400 volunteers annually to manage setup, stage operations, and cleanup. Volunteers contributing at least four hours receive an event T-shirt and free entry to the festival.

Admission to the festival is $10/1-day pass/adult or $15 for the weekend. Children 0-14, SNAP card holders, and Veterans are free.

You can view a complete schedule and vendor list or sign up to volunteer atwww.worldbeatfestival.org or call (503) 581-2004.

About the World Beat Festival: The World Beat Festival originated in the late 1990s and was conceived by two young mothers, Mona Hayes and Kathleen Fish, who wanted a space to celebrate cultural heritage. Starting with a small gathering in 1998, the festival has grown into Oregon’s largest multicultural event of its kind. www.WorldBeatFestival.org, 503-581-2004.

About the Salem Multicultural Institute (SMI): The vision of the Salem Multicultural Institute and the purpose of the World Beat Festival and World Beat Gallery are to create an environment of openness for all people. In all our activities, SMI aims to be family-friendly, economically inclusive, and culturally authentic. Visit the gallery located at 390 Liberty ST SE, Salem. www.salemmulticultural.org.

 

 

Oregon Offers Electric Car Rebates Again – Apply Now Until June 3rd

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Due to high demand and limited funding, OCVRP will be open for a short time in 2024. Vehicles must be purchased or leased between April 3, 2024, to June 3, 2024, to be eligible for a rebate. Applicants have six months from their date of purchase or lease to apply. Low- and moderate-income households can prequalify for the $5,000 Charge Ahead rebate by completing the application now at https://apps.oregon.gov/DEQ/Voucher/apply.

 

 

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